What's Happening In Your World
Earlier this year, it was reported that a coalition of nearly 20 children’s advocacy, health, and  public interests groups are planning to file complaints with the Federal Trade Commission to accuse Happymeal.com, Nick.com, Reesespuffs.com, SubwayKids.com, Trixworld.com, and CartoonNetwork.com of violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) protecting children’s privacy on the internet.  On Wednesday, Federal Trade Commission chairman Jon Leibowitz responded to the advocacy group’s concerns by unveiling stricter rules to strengthen online and mobile privacy for children. The new rules amend COPPA by having new provisions that expand the definition of what is considered personal information in order to trigger parental consent, including location information, videos and photographs and persistent device IDs. Ad networks, social plug-ins and other third parties associated with kids apps and websites, are also brought into the equation; these companies may not knowingly collect children’s information or track their behavior. Google Play and Apple iTunes are exempt from the new rule. “ Let’s be clear about one thing: under this rule, advertisers and even ad networks can continue to advertise, even on sites directed to children ,” Leibowitz said. “ Business models that depend on advertising will continue to thrive. The only limit we place is on behavioral advertising, and in this regard our rule is simple: until and unless you get parental consent, you may not track children to build massive profiles for behavioral advertising purposes. Period. ” The new COPPA rules will go into effect on July 1, 2013.  

FTC Unveils Stricter Rules to Keep Companies From Stalking Children Online

FTCEarlier this year, it was reported that a coalition of nearly 20 children’s advocacy, health, and  public interests groups are planning to file complaints with the Federal Trade Commission to accuse Happymeal.com, Nick.com, Reesespuffs.com, SubwayKids.com, Trixworld.com, and CartoonNetwork.com of violating the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) protecting children’s privacy on the internet.

 On Wednesday, Federal Trade Commission chairman Jon Leibowitz responded to the advocacy group’s concerns by unveiling stricter rules to strengthen online and mobile privacy for children. The new rules amend COPPA by having new provisions that expand the definition of what is considered personal information in order to trigger parental consent, including location information, videos and photographs and persistent device IDs.

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