What's Happening In Your World
By Victor Trammell One of the most prominent names in the American Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s is not really mentioned among more famous figures in one of America’s most tumultuous historical periods. Whitney Young Jr. was the Executive Director of the National Urban League from 1961 to his death in 1971. Young was a key part of the desegregation movement of the civil rights era. He was also a close advisor of President John F. Kennedy and President Lyndon Johnson. Young’s niece is a journalist named Bonnie Boswell. For a decade, she spent her time working on a documentary called The Powerbroker: Whitney Young’s Fight For Civil Rights. Boswell is the film’s executive producer. In an interview with the Daily Beast, Boswell spoke of her experience working on the film (which premiers tonight on the PBS program Independent Lens) and the legacy of her late uncle. Boswell said: “ I wanted to make this film because I wanted to inspire people. Whitney Young was a man who built bridges between rich and poor, black and white during one of the most turbulent times in our history. I think he should be recognized, not just as a civil rights leader or an African American leader, but an American leader who worked to help our country live up to her ideals.” (The Daily Beast) Boswell’s film also features interviews with modern American politicians, scholars, and executives from various racial backgrounds. Individuals such as Henry Louis Gates, Donald Rumsfeld, Howard Zinn, and Kenneth Chennault all make appearances in The Powerbroker . The film is narrated by notable black actress Alfre Woodard. The Powerbroker premiers tonight on PBS at 10pm EST (check local listings).

PBS To Premier Brand New Documentary About Civil Rights Icon Whitney Young Jr.

powerbroker-largeBy Victor Trammell

One of the most prominent names in the American Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s is not really mentioned among more famous figures in one of America’s most tumultuous historical periods.

Whitney Young Jr. was the Executive Director of the National Urban League from 1961 to his death in 1971. Young was a key part of the desegregation movement of the civil rights era. He was also a close advisor of President John F. Kennedy and President Lyndon Johnson.

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