What's Happening In Your World
by Tiara K. Williams, Founder – Reel Righteous Entertainment One of my new year’s resolutions was to learn more about our black experience. I’ve challenged myself to take one day, of each week to research facts from our black history. I’m determined to examine the plights, accomplishments and lingering inquisitions of our ancestry. I often find myself wondering if my 10th-great grandmother had dreams and hopes for me while she lived as a slave? How did her life affect my life directly? There is profound instruction intertwined in our history books and as I constantly search for substance in life, I’m indifferent about seeking advice from a singer who used to sell drugs, or idolizing some “reality-star” who promotes promiscuity on television for ratings. Our black narratives tell a much deeper story. I’m inspired by the passion, audaciousness and dedication. Our history speaks of relentless, uncompromising people that fought, believed and rebelled, overcoming tremendous difficulty despite their circumstances. Those are the mentors worth idolizing. My research included documentaries of African American inventors, philosophers, writers and entrepreneurs. I learned of civil rights movements, the creation of gas masks, bleach, soap, and traffic signals. I was surprised to learn that it was a black man who patented the original remnants of the digital computer. Our contributions to this world have been unprecedented. Amazing. Remarkable. Phenomenal. Unparallel. Unfortunately, this information is not readily taught in our communities or anywhere else, unless you attend a program that specializes in African American literature. But, before we can tie our shoes we’re schooled of the voyages of Christopher Columbus, and quizzed on the accomplishments of George Washington. These are the “important” historical facts in our society. I’ve started to evaluate how the ignorance of black history must be affecting the youth in our communities. I suspect that young black boys and girls conclude that they are not part of a greater legacy nor are they meant to do anything monumental. This rings true especially if they do not have positive role models in their immediate family. But, what if young black men in Chicago linked themselves to their prolific descendants? Would they kill each other in the streets? I wonder if black women saw themselves as nieces of Harriet Tubman would they still post half-naked pictures of themselves on social sites for likes and comments? I’m not criticizing anyone for his or her personal choices. I just wonder if we knew better, would we do better? If we REALLY knew our history would our thoughts, ideas, or goals be more innovatory? I say, yes! But, I’ll keep you posted. I’m currently recreating the wheel. Tiara Williams

Reel Righteous Thought by Tiara K. Williams: Do We Know Our Black History?

tiara

by Tiara K. Williams, Founder – Reel Righteous Entertainment
One of my new year’s resolutions was to learn more about our black experience. I’ve challenged myself to take one day, of each week to research facts from our black history.

I’m determined to examine the plights, accomplishments and lingering inquisitions of our ancestry. I often find myself wondering if my 10th-great grandmother had dreams and hopes for me while she lived as a slave? How did her life affect my life directly?
There is profound instruction intertwined in our history books and as I constantly search for substance in life, I’m indifferent about seeking advice from a singer who used to sell drugs, or idolizing some “reality-star” who promotes promiscuity on television for ratings.

Read Original Article At Naturally Moi


* Email
 First Name
 Last Name
  * = Required Field
 
Email Marketing You Can Trust

8 comments

  1. multi-colored plants and even the girl’s brand name compact owl. Equally as We were oohing in addition to aahing above the number plates, Rachael small got here simply by.
    michael kors outlet online

  2. For Thursdays it is best to have on some thing fashionable or simply have a very designer tote.
    michael kors replica bags

  3. Various other fashions rules (who are as a result of Result in Gals) are generally: It is possible to just use athletic shoes in Workout room daytime as well as in athletics.
    fake ray ban
    [url=http://www.drumcafe.eu/]fake ray ban[/url]

  4. @Tracy Penninger
    What are you talking about? what is racist about this topic and why would a person such as yourself come onto a website like this?You,ve already demonstrated that you don,t know a thing about black history solely for the fact that you mention that some african americans have roots in the carribean which is true but the carribean people originated from africa also because the original nations in the carribean were called carribs.All black folks originated from africa,and if you want to do further research you,ll find that the word africa is,nt even the correct word because the word africa is a greek word meaning to separate.

  5. Why would the author assume her 10th great grandmother was a slave? For that matter, why do so many black people call themselves African- American when so many of their ancestors were from the Carribean? We are a very diverse family and I get so tired of the reverse racism and worry about my grandchildren learning this unacceptable behavior. Instead of listing myself as white anymore, I want legal forms to start having a box for my nationality too, which would be Irish-German-Swedish-Cherokee-American.

  6. Kofi M. G. W. Opantiri

    1. “As our ancestors have told us, self-knowledge is the basis of all knowledge.”
    – – – DR. LINDA MYERS. “RESTORING ORDER IN A CHAOTIC UNIVERSE.” (AUDIO CASSETTE TAPE). NEW YORK, NEW YORK. 10 NOVEMBER 1990. AIRED ON “AFRIKAN MENTAL LIBERATION WEEKEND” (SPIRIT FLIGHT PRODUCTIONS, P.O. BOX 2946, INGLEWOOD, CALIFORNIA 90305, DR. KWAKU PERSON-LYNN, HOST/PRODUCER), KPFK PACIFICA RADIO 90.7 FM, NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CALIFORNIA, 3 FEBRUARY 1991.

    2. “Blacks must reconstruct their historical memory. No nation, no race can face the future unless it knows what it is capable of. This is the function of history.”
    – – – DR. CHARLES S. FINCH, III. QUOTED IN “AFRICAN DREAMS,” NEWSWEEK, VOLUME 68, NUMBER 13 (23 SEPTEMBER 1991), PAGE 42.

    3. “…History is a clock that people use to tell their political and cultural time of day. It is also a compass that people use to find themselves on the map of human geography. The role of history is to tell a people what they have been and where they have been, what they are and where they are. The most important role that history plays is that it has the function of telling a people where they still must go and what they still must be.”
    – – – DR. JOHN HENRIK CLARKE. CAN AFRICAN PEOPLE SAVE THEMSELVES? DETROIT: ALKEBULANS, INC. (P.O. BOX 32651, DETROIT, MI 48232). 1990. PAGE 37. THIS BOOKLET APPEARS LARGELY AS THE FINAL CHAPTER IN DR. CLARKE’S NOTES FOR AN AFRICAN WORLD REVOLUTION: AFRICANS AT THE CROSSROADS.

    4. “If we don’t know our history, or if we’ve made our history unconscious and therefore placed it out of awareness, that unconscious history becomes a source of unconscious motivation, then why we behave the way we do becomes a puzzle. We’re confused by our own behavior. If we want to know why we behave the way we do then we must know our history: the unconscious must be made conscious…

    History is real; it brings real, tangible results. When we work to negate it and not integrate it, when we wish to negate it and not affirm it, then it negates us in the end…

    Simply because we choose to forget a traumatic event, simply because we choose not to learn of a traumatic history and a history that may make us feel ashamed, does not mean that that history is not controlling our behavior. Simply because we don’t know our history, and may have not heard of it does not mean that the history does not control our behavior.”
    – – – DR. AMOS N. WILSON. AMOS N. WILSON. THE FALSIFICATION OF AFRIKAN CONSCIOUSNES: EUROCENTRIC HISTORY, PSYCHIATRY AND THE POLITICS OF WHITE SUPREMCY. NEW YORK: AFRIKAN WORLD INFOSYSTEMS. 1993. PAGES 37, 36 & 33, RESPECTIVELY.

    5. “When you go back into the past, then you will know that you…had made great contributions to society, civilization, science. And that if you once did it, you can do it again; you automatically get the incentive, the inspiration and the energy necessary to duplicate what our forefathers did. That’s why it is so important for you and me to spend time learning something about the past so that we can better understand the present, analyze it, and do something about it.”
    – – – EL-HAJJ MALIK EL-SHABAZZ. “KNOWLEDGE IS THE KEY.” YSB (YOUNG SISTERS AND BROTHERS). (OCTOBER 1991). PAGE 8.

    6. “When we make our history as sacred as religion it will make a difference.”
    – – – IVAN VAN SERTIMA. “FUTURE DIRECTIONS FOR AFRICAN AND AFRICAN AMERICAN CONTENT,” IN INFUSION OF AFRICAN AND AFRICAN-AMERICAN CONTENT IN SCHOOL CURRICULUM: PROCEEDINGS OF THE FIRST NATIONAL CONFERENCE, OCTOBER 1989, ASA G. HILLIARD, III, LUCRETIA PAYTON-STEWART, AND LARRY OBADELE WILLIAMS (EDITORS). MORRISTOWN, NEW JERSEY: AARON PRESS. 1990. PAGE 59.

  7. I’m loving your articles. My resolution to learn more about Black history began when I posted a natural online magazine which includes black history in each issue. Keep up the good work!

  8. Interesting all I hear is crickets, makes me wonder how many black people even care about their history other than Martin Luther King Jr and Malcolm X, but are well versed in people that have made no contribution to our history.

* Email
 First Name
 Last Name
  * = Required Field
 
Email Marketing You Can Trust
Get Your Free Copy of the Black American Money Ebook
Get It Now