What's Happening In Your World
By Victor Trammell In today’s edition of Black Blue Dog’s month-series of editorials titled, Your Black History , I have chosen to chronicle one of America’s most illustrious writers on her birthday. Alice Walker (pictured) is in every way inspirational and relevant to the experience of black America, as well the experience of all women in America. Her work as an activist, poet, and author is a mirror to the nation’s need for radical changes. Her graceful, yet powerful interpretation of social justice will leave a long, lasting legacy that should spark our current and future generations of thinkers. Alice M.Walker was born in Putnam, Georgia on February 9, 1944. Walker’s father, Willie Lee Walker was a farmer. Her mother, Minnie Grant was a house maid. Alice was the youngest of the couple’s eight children. She grew up subjected to the oppressive institution of Jim Crow. However, Alice’s mother refused the stigma of victimization by instilling the desire of education for her daughter Alice, who started first grade at age four. After graduating high school, Walker was granted a full scholarship to Spellman College in 1961. During Walker’s time at Spellman , she met Martin Luther King Jr. She later transferred to Sarah Lawrence College in New York and graduated in 1965. Walker’s first book of poetry was written during her senior year at Sa rah Lawrence College . It was during her college years that she began to embark on her journey of social activism. As an activist, she assisted in aggressive campaigns toward black voter registration in the hideous Jim Crow states of Georgia and Mississippi. She was also a part of the famous March On Washington along with Dr. Martin Luther King in 1963. In 1975, she resumed her writing career by working as an editor of Ms. Magazine. During her time as an editor, she reinvigorated interest in the work of one of her idols, writer Zora Neale Hurston. Walker’s legendary status was permanently cemented in American history when she won the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize for her 1982 novel The Color Purple . The novel was such a classic that it inspired a 1985 film with its same name (starring Oprah Winfrey, Whoopi Goldberg & Danny Glover). There was also a hit Broadway musical produced that was based off the historical novel. On this day, it is my personal honor and pleasure to wish a true American heroine a very happy birthday. May God bless you with a continued life that reciprocates the blessings you deserve from inspiring the whole world.

Your Black History: Pulitzer Prize Winner Alice Walker

imagesBy Victor Trammell

In today’s edition of Black Blue Dog’s month-series of editorials titled, Your Black History, I have chosen to chronicle one of America’s most illustrious writers on her birthday.

Alice Walker (pictured) is in every way inspirational and relevant to the experience of black America, as well the experience of all women in America. Her work as an activist, poet, and author is a mirror to the nation’s need for radical changes. Her graceful, yet powerful interpretation of social justice will leave a long, lasting legacy that should spark our current and future generations of thinkers.

 

Read Original Article At Black Blue Dog

* Email
 First Name
 Last Name
  * = Required Field
 
Email Marketing You Can Trust
* Email
 First Name
 Last Name
  * = Required Field
 
Email Marketing You Can Trust
Get Your Free Copy of the Black American Money Ebook
Get It Now